THE WARRIORS OF THE RAINBOW PROPHECY

“One day… there would come a time, when the earth being ravaged and polluted, the forests being destroyed, the birds would fall from the air, the waters would be blackened, the fish being poisoned in the streams, and the trees would no longer be, mankind as we would know it would all but cease to exist.”

This is how the Rainbow prophecy begins, as retold by a woman of the Cree Indian nation of America over a century ago.

The Rainbow prophecy, as it has come to be known, refers to the keepers of the legends, rituals, and other myths that will be needed when the time comes to restore the health on Earth. It is believed that these legendary beings will return on a day of awakening, when all people will unite and create a new world of justice, peace and freedom, and they will be named the “Warriors of the Rainbow”.

(Source ancient-origins.net)

“One day…there would come a time…” this message is frighteningly becoming a reality and that “time” is coming faster than we dare to think.

How befitting is it then that the mighty Greenpeace sailing vessel “Rainbow Warrior” is named after these mythical folk and Greenpeace exists to be a voice for our fragile Earth, to help find environmental solutions, implement change and take action.

I was fortunate to experience a tour of this iconic ship yesterday during it’s brief visit to Phuket en route to Krabi where it will protest the new coal-fired power plant that is planned to be built there.

Rainbow Warrior III, is a sailing vessel with 54m high masts and 5 sails, it can reach speeds of up to 17 knots under sail. It is staffed by a small crew of 17, who are committed to non violent creative action, paving the way towards a greener, more peaceful world, and who are not frightened to confront the systems that threaten our environment. Funded completely by independent donations, Greenpeace does not accept funding from corporations or governments as it travels the globe defending actions and raising awareness to help protect our planet Earth.

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Screen Shot 2018-06-22 at 10.15.36The stories and history of Greenpeace are amazing and inspiring. They have a clear vision and purpose alongside dedicated and passionate staff. With 26 independent national / regional organisations, they work directly with communities to protect the environment. They are represented in in over 55 countries globally, and have an office in Bangkok as part of Greenpeace Southeast Asia.

For further information check out –www.greenpeace.org

 

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Brain-washing DOES work

Last night, a friend brought us dinner from a local Thai restaurant. The food was delicious, but what ruined the enjoyment for us was the fact that it was packaged in plastic bags AND then put into polystyrene foam boxes (wholly unnecessary).  The polystyrene boxes were clean – I mean, like completely clean! – because the food was in plastic bags, but what should we do with those boxes? Donate them to the other food stalls?

The friend who had brought the food laughed at us. “Just throw the boxes away,” she said, looking at us as if we were barking mad to be stressing over eight polystyrene boxes. “Nobody wants them secondhand, they’re cheap-cheap!”

A few short years ago, the pile of needless food packaging sitting in my dustbin would not have caused me such consternation, but now it does. That eight polystyrene boxes did bother me a great deal. And that is a good thing.

Because they are so bad that New York City is joining a growing group of cities in banning them: single-use expandable polystyrene products (including cups, bowls, plates, takeout containers and trays and packing peanuts) are not allowed to be possessed, sold, or offered in New York City. They are almost impossible to recycle and causes havoc when leaked into environments and contaminate drinking water….imagine eating a ball of styrofoam. That’s what some animals are doing, blocking up their intestines.

Look, this bird is eating discarded foam!

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Photograph from Midtown Miami Magazine. Please click on the read a very good article.

So when people tell me to stop proselytising about environmental issues, I tell them this: brainwashing does work. I absolutely loathe these awful packaging now instead of shrugging them off, ignoring the problem.

I hope more governments will join NYC and other cities in banning single-use EPS or levy high taxes on them to make them unattractive.

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“Bioblitz” – a lovely project for the whole family and community

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Photo: rape bushes(wikipedia)

I never forgot the time my first visitor from Asia, on his first trip to the UK, gawped in wonder at the profusion of yellow flowers that grew along the motorway. He thought they were so beautiful, until I pointed out to him that these plants were actually poisonous weeds: in my teens, I had to clear these rape bushes from the fields before the horses ate them.

 

There’s no doubt, there’s much richness, beauty and diversity in the flora and fauna of lay-bys and hedgerows. I’m not a professional photographer, but whenever I publish and share photographs of aspects of my hometown (Hampshire, UK), people would comment, “Oh, where was that taken?” and almost always expressed surprise when I told them, “Just the hedgerows,” or “Just by the railway line.”

 

Whilst living in Asia, I had a helper from Indonesia who showed me the abundance that was found in the Asian version of lay-bys and hedgerows.  Rosmawati would go for long evening walks in our neighbourhood and would often come back with a stash of plants, flowers, herbs or even unusual insects to show us. I never ceased to be amazed at the treasures she could find in the concrete city that we lived in.

But sad to say, wildlife is fast disappearing all over the world. The naturalist and broadcaster Chris Packham is launching a #WeWantWildlife ~ Citizen Science Campaign.

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For ten days, in his Bioblitz, Chris and his team of experts will be visiting 50 wildlife sites in Scotland, Northern Ireland, England and Wales to highlight the extent to which the nation’s wildlife is under threat. The aim is to record the wildlife species living naturally in nature, rather than in nature reserves.

Please visit his website, and join if you can!

On Monday, 23rd July 2018, the team will be at Yateley Common Country Park, and so will I!  Please follow us here for photos and updates…..and perhaps start a Bioblitz where you live, too? It’s a fabulous project to involve the whole family and community!

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Photo: “Just the hedgerows” (Hampshire, UK)

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Photo: “By the railway line” (Hampshire, UK)

Immerse yourself in the beauty of Yateley Common: Yateley Common.

Environmental stewardship

Here’s the facts:

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(Image: Vizu Organics)

Unless we pass on environmental stewardship to the next generation, our efforts die with us.  And never too young…..

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Here’s a sweet photo of three-year-old William Mosley collecting rubbish on the beach, so disgusted was he by “very silly humans” dropping litter in the streets and everywhere. You can read his story here.

At this age, children are enthusiastic and absorb new ideas like sponges. Live green in your family today and it becomes a way of life for these adults of tomorrow.

But teenagers are every bit as fun to recruit for the green drive: they are vociferous, outspoken and looking for crusades.  Here are four fun things you could do with teenagers:

  1. Visit eco-restaurants for bonding time. Read our Green Spaces review for ideas.
  2. Experiment with making green skincare products.
  3. Repurpose old clothes together. We made a cloth shopping bag from a holey old dress!
  4. Beach clean-ups and BBQ on the beach. We all love a good party.  Please follow us here and on Facebook to be kept informed of our forthcoming party (in Sept/Oct). 

Domestic food waste

It seems that almost all the focus is on plastic because the numbers are glaring: it takes hundreds of years to biodegrade, millions of tons end up in the oceans, all the plastic that has ever been made is still here on earth.

But domestic food waste is another issue that should be on our radar….wait a minute, don’t fruit peelings and vegetable stubs decompose? They’re organic matter, right?

Yes, they do decompose in landfills, but not in a good way as they release methane, which is a greenhouse warming gas (whether you subscribe to the theory of greenhouse warming or not, the fact is that rotting food is clogging up the landfills).

Today, my domestic waste weighs a whopping 5.8 kilograms, and that’s average for this family of three (because we eat lots of fresh stuff, I make every dish up from scratch and I rarely ever buy ready-made-meals). That’s heck a lot of rubbish for the already over-flowing dump!

But I don’t have a garden at the moment, and just throwing food scraps (even if it is just green) will attract rodents.  So making a food composter might be my next project….it looks simple enough (from this excellent youtube video).

Please follow us here (by clicking on the “Follow” icon on the page) or in Facebook. We will keep you up to date in the coming months on the home-made composter as well as other interesting things! Thank you!

Note: Here’s an idea for reducing food scraps – I use them to make delicious and nutritious broth. Please click on this link to read more. We will be adding Leftover Recipes here soon!

 

VISIT: KATHU WET MARKET AND LUNCH AT AN ECO RESTAURANT (Friday 15th June, 10.30am-2pm)

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Kathu Wet Market is reputed to be amongst the best in Phuket and you can pick up lots of fresh bargains here, including the more exotic stuff.

Taifuun, the Thai owner of the eco-friendly Quick Burger Bar will join us for our market walkabout (and explain things to us) before lunch at his restaurant nearby, where homemade burgers cost only 79THB.

There is no cost for this trip – you just have to pay for your own lunch. We will meet at the CIS office at 10.30am and car pool over. Don’t forget to bring your bags!!!

Join us this Friday. Unfortunately, the maximum number is 10, so please let us know ASAP if you plan on coming. Do come, it will be fun!

Environmentally friendly educational toys

Think before you buy: your kids’ toys are killing the planet. 90% of all toys sold is made of plastics, and there are very few toys that are able to be recycled or repurposed.

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When my children were tiny, I caused some bad feelings amongst family members because I banned plastic toys: I politely refused to accept those noisy, battery-operated, garish plastic monstrosity, especially those with flashing lights!

My parents-in-law used to make toys for my children: almost 30 years later, we still have some of those precious toys (Photo: Harry Helium, made by my mother-in-law based on a story I wrote).

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My parents, who weren’t so good with the sewing machine or hammer, nails and saw, entertained the children with nature (Photo: drawing from 30 years ago!)

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No, they did not suffer not owning any plastic toys. They made their own with discarded packaging and stuff they find around the house (Photo: the two sisters making something).

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When my children got older, I softened my stance a bit and allowed Legos into the house. But by then, they had gotten over the idea that toys are fun. They much preferred pets, and at one stage, we had two dogs, two cats and eleven rabbits. That rather large menagerie did not leave them much time for gadgets either!

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Recently, I visited my children’s father’s classroom (he teaches Design & Technology) and saw these Chinese puzzles that his Year 8 students made:

This can be made environmentally friendly by suing softwood. The design is from MYP Design & Technology textbook published by IBID Press.

Here is something you can make simply at home with your children, using paper or even flour tortilla! A hexaflaxagon that my daughter made:

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The instructions are here. Have fun!

Related reading: There’s A Huge Problem With Kids’ Toys That No One’s Talking About

Here’s an innovative company repurposing plastic toys:

First published in www.raisinghappystrongkids.com

The cost of small things

Last week, we made four circuits round a particular block in Phuket Town trying to find parking so that we can buy ribbons. Think about the hydrocarbons burned in our quest to buy those pretty things.

Moreover, those pretty things, if you think about it, are synthetic materials (polyester, nylon, and polypropylene) and harsh dyes. There is nothing natural or organic about those ribbons at all – they cost a mere THB50 per roll, so chances are that they were manufactured in some sweat shop with slave labour.

But we need those ribbons!

Do we, actually?

I managed to salvage these from old clothes that are headed for the recycling bin. And these “ribbons” are much prettier, if you ask me. I wish I had thought about that sooner.

The thing to do is to get into the repurposing mindset and delete the word “BUY, BUY, BUY” from our modern psyche. 

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What do you know about paper towels?

In my daughter’s school in Phuket, there is a sign above the paper towel dispenser in the loos that say, ‘Use one sheet only’.

Good idea! We often don’t think about the effects of paper towels on the environment. They are not plastic, are they? And don’t they biodegrade?

In America, 517,230,000 pounds of paper towels are used each year.  Here’s an interesting (and engaging) talk by Joe Smith for TED. Definitely worth watching! And please share with your children too….it’s fun to do together!

Plastic – it needs government involvement

Asia is the worst region for massively producing and underly managing its plastic waste. According to UN Environment:

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On my walk this morning, I saw many discarded ones (which will inevitably end up in landfills and oceans) and was offered many by shopkeepers who automatically pack my purchases into plastic bags.

Try as we might carrying our own reusable bags, our efforts need to be backed by governmental legislation.  This is the success of Ireland’s “PLASTAX”:

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Yesterday, it was reported that the Indian Prime Minister vows to abolish single-use plastic by 2022. You can read it here.

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Here’s hoping that other governments, particularly in Asia, will jump on this bandwagon.

In the meantime, pop over to our ideas section to see how we made a reusable bag from an old dress in less than 5 minutes 🙂  Please click on this link.